Nursing brassiere

The term “nursing brassiere” took on an entirely different meaning this morning. Story and Annalie are beginning to teeth and so they like to gum at things. When I looked in at Story this morning somehow she had gotten her hands on a nursing brassiere and she was gumming away at it. In fact, you might say she was nursing the nursing bra.

A rough night

You know it has been a rough night when sometime late in the afternoon I emerge from the house clad in baggy pyjama pants with stained white undershirt partially on, completely unshaven, crazed look in my eyes as I clutch an empty baby bottle. Usually dog is in tow to let her out of the house to have a merciful pee in the front yard. While the door is open you can hear the wails of anguish of what appears to be a milk starved infant. Yep, it was a rough night.

The twins first Thanksgiving dinner

It is inspiring to see what a father can do while holding a baby in one hand. I am often at the keyboard with a baby perched on my knee watching as I tap-tap-tap on the keyboard. They are so inquisitive of all that surrounds them. This evening I ate my Thanksgiving dinner with a baby perched on the knee. Cutting my food with my fork and eating with one hand. It is heavenly to have a such great dinner company. It is also interesting to think of how the wee’uns see the world; while this is one in a long series of Thanksgiving dinners, this is Annalie and Story’s first Thanksgiving. Life is beautiful.

Coffee at the village

This morning Annalie and I went down to the Village for an early Thanksgiving coffee. It is neat to see so many other fathers out with their little ones. There was one father who came in with a baby even smaller and then my twin dolls. I like this. Yesterday I saw many fathers walking while pushing strollers. Funny how you do not notice these things until you have joined the ranks of the fathers walking with little ones.

The same applies to vans. Who notices vans until you need one? I am getting tired of trying to jam myself, my partner and the twins into the car. Driving with my knees pressed against the steering wheel really sucks. It is a fine balance of pain though, which sucks more, jamming self against steering wheel or driving a van? At some point we will have to begin test driving vehicles.

At this point we are gearing up for a Thanksgiving walk through the forest. It is fun to watch the girls looking at the trees with such wonder. I can only imagine the brain development that is taking place every time we step outside. And step outside we will now. More later.

Sunday morning breakfast

Went to my usual Sunday morning breakfast with a baby. Today was Story’s turn to get out for one-to-one time with her Papa. She was a little cranky being out today probably because her mother wrapped her in so many layers of clothing she could barely move Lord help us when it actually gets cold outside). Then sitting in the car seat at the diner table while I drink coffee and talk about motorcycles is probably not much fun. She really likes being held as if she is standing up so that she can look around and see what is going on around her. That puts a smile on her face.

Fortunately it was not fine dining so the other people in the diner really could not complain that there was a whiny baby in the house. Besides, it is usually the same people who go to the diner each Sunday so they are used to me and my twins coming to eat there on Sundays.

Diapers

Probably the single most important product we use are diapers. Holy crap do we use a lot of diapers. I get quite excited when I go to Costco and see there is a coupon for diapers. Ahhh…the small pleasures we get from life now.

Establishing a Baseline

On April 17th 2009 my life changed forever; my partner and I gave birth to twin baby girls. Well, it was more her than me who gave birth, but everyone talks like it was a team effort. I will accept some credit for their birth but my goodness, my contribution was a lot more pleasurable than her contributions.

Thankfully they are fraternal twins so I can tell them apart, usually. They were born on the first day of week 33 of the pregnancy so they were, obviously, seven weeks early. Instead of coming home right away though, the girls had to stay in the Royal Columbian Hospital until they were able to eat, breathe and sleep without any assistance. When they were born they were 1705 grams and 1750 grams. That is about three pounds, six ounces and three pounds fourteen ounces. They grew to about five pounds each before they came home; they ended up coming home around the end of May.

We named Baby A, as the government bureaucrats call the first born child Annalie. That is a Swedish name so it is actually pronounced “Onnalee” with the emphasis on the “Onna” part of her name. Baby B’s name is Story; she was born (yes they were born through the regular route, not by C-section) two minutes after Onnalie. You have to wonder what it will it be like for her to have an older sister who is actually only two minutes older.